African literature and culture

See Article History African literature, the body of traditional oral and written literatures in Afro-Asiatic and African languages together with works written by Africans in European languages.

African literature and culture

African-American dance African-American dancelike other aspects of African-American culture, finds its earliest roots in the dances of the hundreds of African ethnic groups that made up African slaves in the Americas as well as influences from European sources in the United States.

Dance in the African tradition, and thus in the tradition of slaves, was a part of both everyday life and special occasions.

African literature - Wikipedia

Many of these traditions such as get downring shoutsand other elements of African body language survive as elements of modern dance. These shows often presented African Americans as caricatures for ridicule to large audiences. The first African-American dance to become popular with white dancers was the cakewalk in African-American dance forms such as tapa combination of African and European influences, gained widespread popularity thanks to dancers such as Bill Robinson and were used by leading white choreographers, who often hired African-American dancers.

Groups such as the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater have continued to contribute to the growth of this form. Modern popular dance in America is also greatly influenced by African-American dance.

American popular dance has also drawn many influences from African-American dance most notably in the hip-hop genre. African-American art From its early origins in slave communities, through the end of the 20th century, African-American art has made a vital contribution to the art of the United States.

These artifacts have similarities with comparable crafts in West and Central Africa.

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In contrast, African-American artisans like the New England—based engraver Scipio Moorhead and the Baltimore portrait painter Joshua Johnson created art that was conceived in a thoroughly western European fashion. Martinmixed-media collage on rag paper After the American Civil Warmuseums and galleries began more frequently to display the work of African-American artists.

Cultural expression in mainstream venues was still limited by the dominant European aesthetic and by racial prejudice. To increase the visibility of their work, many African-American artists traveled to Europe where they had greater freedom.

In later years, other programs and institutions, such as the New York City-based Harmon Foundationhelped to foster African-American artistic talent. Augusta SavageElizabeth CatlettLois Mailou JonesRomare BeardenJacob Lawrenceand others exhibited in museums and juried art shows, and built reputations and followings for themselves.

In the s and s, there were very few widely accepted African-American artists. Pierce, Floridacreated idyllic, quickly realized images of the Florida landscape and peddled some 50, of them from the trunks of their cars.

They sold their art directly to the public rather than through galleries and art agents, thus receiving the name "The Highwaymen". Rediscovered in the mids, today they are recognized as an important part of American folk history.

The sculptor Martin Puryearwhose work has been acclaimed for years, was being honored with a year retrospective of his work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in November African-American literature African-American literature has its roots in the oral traditions of African slaves in America.

The slaves used stories and fables in much the same way as they used music. These authors reached early high points by telling slave narratives.For those interested in American literatures and cultures, we draw upon the Department's commitment to interdisciplinary inquiry to provide students with the opportunity to explore several dimensions of scholarship and critical inquiry.

Prospective applicants interested in the study of American literature and culture should follow the. Art, music, and oral literature serve to reinforce existing religious and social patterns. The Westernized minority, influenced by European culture and Christianity, first rejected African traditional culture, but with the rise of African nationalism, a cultural revival occurred.

The culture of Africa is varied and manifold, consisting of a mixture of countries with various tribes that each have their own unique characteristic from the continent of Africa.

It is a product of the diverse populations that today inhabit the continent of Africa and the African Diaspora.

African literature and culture

African-American culture, also known as Black American culture, refers to the contributions of African Americans to the culture of the United States, either as part .

African Literature and Culture: African writers’ representation of male-female relationships Analyzing male-female relationships in African literature enables a better understanding of how African writers view the gender roles including the application of religious aspects, marriage and identity, midwives and slave women, nationalism, and migration.

The continent of Africa is composed of 54 different nations with a rich literary history. Make sure you understand how literature developed in.

African-American culture - Wikipedia